Late Life

The Center's faculty has advanced our understanding of the onset of and treatment for late life depression.

Davangere P. Devanand, MBBS, MD

Davangere P. Devanand, MBBS, MD

Dr. Devanand is a professor of psychiatry and neurology, and he serves as director of Geriatric Psychiatry in the Department of Psychiatry at Columbia University Irving Medical Center. He received his medical degree at Christian Medical College, Vellore, India, and completed his psychiatry residency training at S.U.N.Y. Upstate Medical Center in Syracuse, NY, and Yale University School of Medicine. Dr. Devanand has written and co-written three books, and he has authored over 300 peer-reviewed publications. His research helped to define the clinical features and treatment response in elderly patients with dysthymic disorder, a chronic depressive illness. He pioneered studies on the interface between depression and cognitive impairment in the elderly, and he is well-known for his research on early diagnostic markers of Alzheimer’s disease and the treatment of psychosis and agitation in this disorder. He has been principal investigator on research grants from the National Institute of Aging, National Institute of Mental Health, Department of Defense, Alzheimer’s Association, NARSAD, and the Dana Foundation, and has received several awards, including the International Psychogeriatrics Association Research Award, Indo-American Psychiatric Association Distinguished Scientist Award, American Psychiatric Association Jack Weinberg Memorial Award in Geriatric Psychiatry, American Association of Geriatric Psychiatry Distinguished Investigator Award, and American College of Psychiatrists Award for Research in Geriatric Psychiatry.

Current Projects

1. Olfactory Impairment in Offspring Study of Racial Disparities in Alzheimer’s Disease

Grant: R01 AG058767

Role: Principal Investigator

Description: The overarching goal of this project is to identify priority biological or social factors for intervention during the preclinical stage of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) and determine whether strategies to prevent AD should differ across race/ethnicity. Adding odor identification testing furthers these goals in the existing project and allows for the testing of specific hypotheses that will enhance our understanding of the associations and potential utility of this inexpensive early biomarker of AD.

2. Cognitive Training and Neuroplasticity in Mild Cognitive Impairment

Grant: R01 AG052440

Role: Principal Investigator

Description: This project aims to address three key issues that have not been addressed systematically in a single well-controlled study in Mild Cognitive Impairment (MCI): Does Computerize Cognitive Training (CCT) lead to improved cognitive functioning, do the effects of CCT transfer to functional ability and tasks of everyday life, and does CCT lead to long-term changes in brain networks, e.g., the default mode network using resting fMRI?

3. Anti-viral Therapy in Alzheimer’s Disease

Grant: R01 AG055422

Role: Principal Investigator

Description: This projects marks the first-ever clinical trial to directly address the long-standing viral etiology hypothesis of Alzheimer’s Disease (AD), which posits that viruses, particularly the very common HSV1 and HSV2, may be etiologic or contribute to the pathology of AD.

Recent Publications

Goldberg, T. E., Huey, E. D., & Devanand, D. P. (2020). Association of APOE e2 genotype with Alzheimer's and non-Alzheimer's neurodegenerative pathologies. Nature Communications, 11(1), 4727.

Devanand, D. P., Lee, S., Luchsinger, J. A., Andrews, H., Goldberg, T., Huey, E. D., Schupf, N., Manly, J., Stern, Y., Kreisl, W. C., & Mayeux, R. (2020). Intact global cognitive and olfactory ability predicts lack of transition to dementia. Alzheimer's & Dementia, 16(2), 326-334.

Devanand, D. P., Andrews, H., Kreisl, W. C., Razlighi, Q., Gershon, A., Stern, Y., Mintz, A., Wisniewski, T., Acosta, E., Pollina, J., Katsikoumbas, M., Bell, K. L., Pelton, G. H., Deliyannides, D., Prasad, K. M., & Huey, E. D. (2020). Antiviral therapy: Valacyclovir Treatment of Alzheimer's Disease (VALAD) Trial: protocol for a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, treatment trial. BMJ Open, 10(2), e032112.

Contact

Email: dpd3@cumc.columbia.edu

Phone: 646-774-8658

Office Address: 1051 Riverside Drive, Unit 126, New York, NY 10032


Steven P. Roose, MD

Steven P. Roose, MD

The primary focus of Dr. Roose’s research is the phenomenology, psychobiology, and treatment of affective disorders in depression, particularly in older patients. Initially, his research focused on the relationship between cardiovascular disease and depression as well as the use of antidepressant medications in depressed patients with cardiovascular comorbidities. This work established an evidence base to make decisions about differential therapeutics in depressed patients with cardiovascular problems in addition to providing information about the pathophysiology of this comorbidity. As Dr. Roose’s initial focus expanded, he conducted numerous antidepressant clinical trials for late life depression, including trials of tricyclic agents vs. selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and augmentation trials for treatment resistant late life depression. He was the principal investigator on the “old-old” study, a placebo-controlled trial of citalopram in depressed patients with a mean age of 80 years with moderate to severe medical comorbidity. Currently, he is the principal investigator for the Columbia site on the OPTIMUM study, the largest clinical trial of treatment resistant depression ever conducted in people over the age of 60. Another focus of his work has been the development of young researchers. He is the principal investigator of the T-32 in Research Training for Late-Life Neuropsychiatric Disorders and the T-32 Research Training in Mood and Anxiety Disorders: From Animal Models to Patients. He is also the research training director for the Conte Center Administrative Core.

Current Projects

1. Research Training in Mood and Anxiety Disorders

Grant: T32 MH015144

Role: Principal Investigator

Description: The goal of this program is to train young investigators committed to basic and clinical research in affective and related psychiatric disorders.

2. Research Training in Late Life Neuropsychiatric Disorders

Grant: T32 MH020004

Role: Principal Investigator

Description: The goal of this program is to train young investigators committed to basic and clinical research in late life psychiatric disorders.

3. Optimizing Outcomes in Treatment-Resistant Depression in Older Adults (OPTIMUM study)

Grant: PCORI

Role: Site Principal Investigator

Description: The primary goal of this multi-center pragmatic PCORI trial is to provide evidence for the treatment of treatment-resistant depression in older adults, elucidate how aging alters the risk/benefit ratio of antidepressant treatment in this group, and to disseminate this evidence to the stakeholders to offer older adults the optimal treatment they deserve.

Recent Publications

Rutherford, B. R., & Roose, S. P. (2013). A model of placebo response in antidepressant clinical trials. American Journal of Psychiatry, 170(7), 723-733.

Roose, S. P., Rutherford, B. R., Wall, M. M., & Thase, M. E. (2016). Practising evidence-based medicine in an era of high placebo response: number needed to treat reconsidered. British Journal of Psychiatry, 208(5), 416-420.

Roose, S. P., & Rutherford, B. R. (2016). Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors and operative bleeding risk: A review of the literature. Journal of Clinical Psychopharmacology, 36(6), 704-709

Contact

Email: spr2@cumc.columbia.edu

Phone: 646-774-8661

Office Address: 1051 Riverside Drive, New York, NY 10032