Jay Gingrich, MD, PhD

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Overview

The mouse represents the most tractable experimental model of vertebrate behavior and brain function currently available. We use genetic, pharmacologic, environmental, and other manipulations to probe mechanisms underlying normal and abnormal behaviors that have relevance to neuropsychiatry. Current projects examine the role of serotonin in brain development, the role of serotonin signaling in anxiety, depression, and psychosis; the epigenetics of complex disorders such as autism and schizophrenia, and the biological basis of environmental effects on genetic vulnerabilities to behavioral abnormalities. The mouse and the powerful techniques that can be applied to its study offer the capacity go beyond correlation and establish causality in our quest to understand how the brain affects behavior.

Academic Appointments

  • Sackler Institute Professor of Developmental Psychology (in Psychiatry) at the Columbia University Medical Center

Gender

  • Male

Research

The mouse represents the most tractable experimental model of vertebrate behavior and brain function currently available. We use genetic, pharmacologic, environmental, and other manipulations to probe mechanisms underlying normal and abnormal behaviors that have relevance to neuropsychiatry. Current projects examine the role of serotonin in brain development, the role of serotonin signaling in anxiety, depression, and psychosis; the epigenetics of complex disorders such as autism and schizophrenia, and the biological basis of environmental effects on genetic vulnerabilities to behavioral abnormalities. The mouse and the powerful techniques that can be applied to its study offer the capacity go beyond correlation and establish causality in our quest to understand how the brain affects behavior.

Research Interests

  • Cognitive/Systems Neuroscience
  • Depression, Anxiety, Schizophrenia
  • Models of Psychiatric Disorders
  • Neurobiology of Disease
  • Neurogenetics
  • Treatment of Psychiatric Disorders in Pregnancy
  • Treatment Resistance

Selected Publications

1: Gingrich JA, Malm H, Ansorge MS, Brown A, Sourander A, Suri D, Teixeira CM,Caffrey Cagliostro MK, Mahadevia D, Weissman MM. New Insights into How SerotoninSelective Reuptake Inhibitors Shape the Developing Brain. Birth Defects Res.2017 Jul 17;109(12):924-932.

2: Lugo-Candelas C, Cha J, Hong S, Bastidas V, Weissman M, Fifer WP, Myers M,Talati A, Bansal R, Peterson BS, Monk C, Gingrich JA, Posner J. AssociationsBetween Brain Structure and Connectivity in Infants and Exposure to SelectiveSerotonin Reuptake Inhibitors During Pregnancy. JAMA Pediatr. 2018 Jun1;172(6):525-533

3: Grieve PG, Fifer WP, Cousy NP, Monk CE, Stark RI, Gingrich JA, Myers MM.Neonatal infant EEG bursts are altered by prenatal maternal depression andserotonin selective reuptake inhibitor use. Clin Neurophysiol. 2019Nov;130(11):2019-2025.

4: Brown AS, Gyllenberg D, Malm H, McKeague IW, Hinkka-Yli-Salomäki S, Artama M,Gissler M, Cheslack-Postava K, Weissman MM, Gingrich JA, Sourander A.Association of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Exposure During PregnancyWith Speech, Scholastic, and Motor Disorders in Offspring. JAMA Psychiatry. 2016Nov 1;73(11):1163-1170.

5: Malm H, Brown AS, Gissler M, Gyllenberg D, Hinkka-Yli-Salomäki S, McKeagueIW, Weissman M, Wickramaratne P, Artama M, Gingrich JA, Sourander A. GestationalExposure to Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and Offspring PsychiatricDisorders: A National Register-Based Study. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry.2016 May;55(5):359-66

6: McOmish CE, Demireva EY, Gingrich JA. Developmental expression of mGlu2 andmGlu3 in the mouse brain. Gene Expr Patterns. 2016 Nov;22(2):46-53.