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  • Source:

    New York Times
    June 8, 2017

    Dr. Rachel Ginsberg works with clients on lack of emotional readiness and academic and “adulting” skills, as well as on social anxiety — issues that can become more apparent in college...

  • Source:

    US News & World Report
    May 18, 2017

    Dr. Drew Ramsey: “People who eat a lot of fast food have about a 60-80% increased risk of developing depression, and those who eat a Mediterranean diet have a reduced risk of 40-50 percent,”

    Topic

  • Source:

    Medscape
    May 18, 2017

    Dr. Jeffrey Lieberman discusses two positive developments with major implications for the field of psychiatry.

  • Source:

    Quartz
    May 18, 2017

    Anorexia has a significant genetic component...“There seems to be a biological vulnerability,” said Dr. Joanna Steinglass. “You don’t get it because of something someone says to you.”

  • Source:

    Refinery 29
    May 18, 2017

    Any excessive fear can be considered a phobia, but most phobias are "highly circumscribed," meaning they're very specific, says Dr. Franklin Schneier.

  • Source:

    New Yorker
    May 18, 2017

    Dr. Pablo Goldberg cited APA guidelines: “Psychotherapy is a relationship between two people. Having somebody witness that is certainly not meant to be part of the process.”

  • Source:

    Teen Vogue
    May 18, 2017

    Dr. Madelyn Gould noted that the show does raise awareness, but that's not enough. "It has to raise an appropriate conversation, because an inappropriate conversation can actually do some harm.” 

  • Source:

    Spectrum News
    May 18, 2017

    The association between ADHD and autism is strongest among identical twins, who share the same DNA.. The results show a clear drop-off from identical to fraternal twins, says Dr. Alan Brown.

  • Source:

    Washington Post
    May 17, 2017

    "Psycho-stimulants can reduce some of the really negative consequences of ADHD and really help people with ADHD lead safer lives," said Dr. Jonathan Posner

  • May 15, 2017

    The brain’s mu opioid receptors are responsible for the depression-relieving effects of an antidepressant called tianeptine, reports a new study.

    Topic

    Mu opioid receptors in the brain

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