Current Studies

The aV1ation Study

Principal Investigator Jeremy Veenstra-VanderWeele, MD

The Translational Medicine Program at the Center for Autism and the Developing Brain is recruiting individuals with autism from 5 17 years of age with an IQ over 70 to participate in our study called aV1ation. The purpose of this study is to test an investigational medicine that blocks a hormone receptor in the brain linked to the control of socialization, stress, anxiety and aggression. We want to see if this medicine is effective as a treatment to help improve social functioning in children with ASD. To determine this, participants will be randomly assigned to take the investigational drug or a placebo pill. Participation lasts up to 39 weeks and will involve regular visits to the Center for Autism and the Developing Brain. This will allow the study team to assess participants general health, social communication skills and social interaction skills. Participants will not have to pay for any study related treatments, lab tests, or assessments and will also be reimbursed $50 per visit.

Autism Biorepository

The Translational Medicine Program at the Center for Autism and the Developing Brain is recruiting individuals with autism from 1 to 40 years of age and their biological family members from 1 to 70 years of age to participate in our Autism Biorepository. Participants will be given a travel reimbursement of $25 for 2 family members, $30 for 3 family members, and $40 for 4 or more family members. The purpose of this study is to determine genetic factors that influence the development of autism. If you would like more information or would like to participate in the research study, you can email Elizabeth Aaron at ea2781@cumc.columbia.edu or call her at 914-997-5242.

The FX-LEARN Study

The Translational Medicine Program at the Center for Autism and the Developing Brain is recruiting children with Fragile-X syndrome from 32 months to 6 years of age to participate in our study called FX-LEARN. Participation comes at no cost to the family, and participants will be given a reimbursement at each visit. The purpose of this study is to find out if the drug AFQ056, made by the pharmaceutical company Novartis, is safe and has beneficial effects on language learning in children who have Fragile-X syndrome (FXS). The study also aims to find out if a structured language intervention can help children with Fragile-X syndrome communicate better. If you would like more information or would like to participate in the research study, you can email Elizabeth Aaron at ea2781@cumc.columbia.edu or call her at 914-997-5242.

Interested in Learning More?

Contact Us!

Micah Davoren
914-997-5587
md3636@cumc.columbia.edu