Current Studies

IM Ketamine vs Midazolam for Suicidal ER Patients

Principal Investigator: Michael Grunebaum, MD

The goal of this study is to examine how effective the experimental antidepressant ketamine is for reducing suicidal thoughts and depressive symptoms. The study recruits participants in the New York-Presbyterian/Columbia Comprehensive Psychiatric Emergency Program (CPEP). After clinical assessments, participants receive a single intramuscular injection of ketamine or the comparison medication midazolam and after are admitted for inpatient treatment. Follow up assessments occur for the duration of the inpatient stay and four weeks after discharge.  

  • Principal Investigator:

    Jeffrey M. Miller, MD
    We are seeking patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) who are currently experiencing symptoms despite current medication treatment to participate in a research study involving brain imaging and treatment. The goal of this study is to examine whether a type of brain imaging called PET imaging can predict how much benefit patients will have in their OCD symptoms from treatment with an anti-inflammatory medication called celecoxib, which is not FDA approved for this purpose. This study is seeking adults between the ages 18 and 55 years old who have OCD. Eligible participants with OCD...
  • Principal Investigator:

    Martin Joseph Kean Lan, MD
    This is a research study to understand what causes bipolar disorder and how medications treat bipolar depression. Particularly, we are looking at the importance of inflammation in the process. If you participate, you will receive an experimental medication for your depression named ethyl eicosapentaenoic acid (ethyl EPA), an omega 3 fatty acid. You will also have genetic testing and three different brain scans (one MRI and two PET scans). The study is funded by the Columbia University Irving Institute to improve the treatment of bipolar disorder. Please contact us if you are interested in...
  • Principal Investigator:

    M. Elizabeth Sublette, MD, PhD
    This research study uses non-invasive brain imaging called functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). For fNIRS, a small infrared bulb shines light through the skull, and a special light detector is able to measure oxygen use in the brain. Our goal is to understand oxygen use by brain mitochondria cells in major depression and how this is affected by past COVID exposure. Participation includes screening and psychological interviews conducted remotely by phone or video, and one 1 hour visit for a blood test and the fNIRS procedure. For in-person procedures, we follow rigorous medical...
  • Principal Investigator:

    M. Elizabeth Sublette, MD, PhD
    This research study uses non-invasive brain imaging called functional near-infrared spectroscopy (fNIRS). For fNIRS, a small infrared bulb shines light through the skull, and a special light detector is able to measure oxygen use in the brain. Our goal is to understand oxygen use by brain mitochondria cells in major depression and how this is affected by past COVID exposure. Participation includes screening and psychological interviews conducted remotely by phone or video, and one 1 hour visit for a blood test and the fNIRS procedure. For in-person procedures, we follow rigorous medical...
  • Principal Investigator:

    M. Elizabeth Sublette, MD, PhD
    This research study aims to explore the biological causes of depression using brain imaging (MRI and PET), infrared spectroscopy, and clinical assessments. Your participation in this study will help researchers at Columbia University better understand the causes of depression. Eligible individuals will be compensated up to $725 and local transportation will be covered. To reduce risk of COVID-19 during in-person visits, participants will have a free COVID test before starting.
  • Principal Investigator:

    M. Elizabeth Sublette, MD, PhD
    Are you feeling depressed? Researchers at Columbia University are using brain imaging to understand the biological causes of Major Depressive Disorder. Participation in this study would entail brain imaging scans (MRI and PET), infrared spectroscopy, and clinical assessments. Eligible individuals will be compensated up to $725 and may receive up to 6 months of free doctor visits for medication-based treatment. Local transportation will be covered. To reduce risk of COVID-19 during in-person visits, participants will have a free COVID test before starting.
  • Principal Investigator:

    Jeffrey M. Miller, MD
    Do you suffer from depression? Have standard treatments not been helpful? Researchers at Columbia University Irving Medical Center are conducting a study of an experimental antidepressant called ketamine, which can provide rapid relief of depressive symptoms in some patients. The study involves an inpatient stay, during which participants undergo brain imaging before and after ketamine treatment, and receive 4 intravenous infusions of ketamine over two weeks. Financial compensation of up to $600 is provided for time and effort, and outpatient psychiatric treatment is provided at no cost after...
  • Principal Investigator:

    Jeffrey M. Miller, MD
    The goal of this study is to examine how effective and well-tolerated a possible new treatment for individuals who injure themselves frequently will be. All research procedures can be done from home no in-person visits are required. We are studying a minimal-risk form of electrical brain stimulation called transcranial direct current stimulation, or tDCS. Previous studies using tDCS have shown that it is helpful in treating conditions like depression and chronic pain. tDCS is administered using two small electrodes that are applied to the scalp. A low current is applied to the electrodes...
  • Principal Investigator:

    Jeffrey M. Miller, MD
    The goal of this study is to examine how effective and well-tolerated a possible new treatment for individuals who injure themselves frequently will be. All research procedures can be done from home no in-person visits are required. We are studying a minimal-risk form of electrical brain stimulation called transcranial direct current stimulation, or tDCS. Previous studies using tDCS have shown that it is helpful in treating conditions like depression and chronic pain. tDCS is administered using two small electrodes that are applied to the scalp. A low current is applied to the electrodes...
  • Principal Investigator:

    Jeffrey M. Miller, MD
    The goal of this study is to examine how effective and well-tolerated a possible new treatment for individuals who injure themselves frequently will be. All research procedures can be done from home no in-person visits are required. We are studying a minimal-risk form of electrical brain stimulation called transcranial direct current stimulation, or tDCS. Previous studies using tDCS have shown that it is helpful in treating conditions like depression and chronic pain. tDCS is administered using two small electrodes that are applied to the scalp. A low current is applied to the electrodes...
  • Principal Investigator:

    Barbara H. Stanley, PhD
    Our research team studies the biological causes of depression and suicidal behavior using behavioral research. Our ultimate goal is to improve prevention of suicide. You may be eligible if you have depression either with or without suicidal thoughts or previous suicide attempts. Participation involves clinical assessments, a week-long phone survey, a stress test and computer games, with compensation of $250. If you also sign up for our companion neuroimaging study, you could receive up to a total of $1,250 and 6 months of free psychiatrist visits for medication treatment. Our rigorous safety...
  • Principal Investigator:

    Barbara H. Stanley, PhD
    Our research team studies the biological causes of depression and suicidal behavior. Our ultimate goal is to improve prevention of suicide. You may be eligible to participate as a healthy control if you do not have psychiatric illness. Participation involves clinical assessments, a week-long phone survey, a stress test and computer games, with compensation of $250. If you also sign up for our neuroimaging study, you could receive up to a total of $1,250. Our rigorous safety protocols minimize the risk of COVID-19 exposure.