Current Studies

  • Principal Investigator:

    J. John Mann, MD
    This NIH-funded research study uses brain imaging to explore the biological causes of major depression and suicide. We hope to develop a better understanding of how people who feel depressed and suicidal cope with their feelings so we can improve treatment and prevention. You may qualify as a healthy control if you do not have psychiatric illness. Participation involves a set of diagnostic interviews, brain imaging scans (MRI and PET) and neuropsychological tasks. Eligible individuals will be compensated up to $750. If you also sign up for our companion behavioral study, you could receive up...
  • Principal Investigator:

    M. Elizabeth Sublette, MD, PhD
    This research study uses brain imaging to explore the biological causes of major depressive disorder. Participation includes clinical assessments, brain imaging scans (MRI and PET), measurement of oxygen in the brain using infra-red spectroscopy. Your participation in this research study at Columbia University/the New York State Psychiatric Institute will help further the understanding of causes of depression. Investigator: M. Elizabeth Sublette. Eligible individuals will be compensated up to $725. We will pay for Uber transportation within NYC. We are taking extra precautions at NYSPI to...
  • Principal Investigator:

    M. Elizabeth Sublette, MD, PhD
    This research study uses brain imaging to explore the biological causes of major depressive disorder. Participation includes brain imaging scans (MRI and PET), measurement of oxygen in the brain using infra-red spectroscopy, and clinical assessments. Your participation in this research study at Columbia University/the New York State Psychiatric Institute will help further the understanding of causes of depression. Investigator: M. Elizabeth Sublette. Eligible individuals will be compensated up to $725 and may receive up to 6 months of free doctors visits for medication-based treatment. We...
  • Principal Investigator:

    J. John Mann, MD
    This NIH-funded research study uses brain imaging to explore the biological causes of major depression and suicide. We hope to develop a better understanding of how people who feel depressed and suicidal cope with their feelings so we can improve treatment and prevention. You may qualify if you have depression with or without suicidal thoughts or previous suicide attempts. Participation involves a set of diagnostic interviews, brain imaging scans (MRI and PET) and neuropsychological tasks. Eligible individuals will be compensated up to $750 and may receive up to 6 months of free doctor visits...
  • Principal Investigator:

    Francesca Zanderigo, PhD
    Note: Due to COVID-19, all the research procedures, except the phone screening for this study, has been on pause. The in-person screening and the research procedures will start after the pause is lifted. The purpose of this study is to examine the use of a new portable brain imaging device to study a measure of brain activity, and to develop optimal methods for analyzing the data from this device. After baseline assessments including clinical interview, physical exam, and blood tests, participants will undergo 3 brain scans on separate days: two Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scans, each...
  • Principal Investigator:

    Jeffrey M. Miller, MD
    The goal of this study is to examine how effective and well-tolerated a possible new treatment for individuals who injure themselves frequently will be. All research procedures can be done from home no in-person visits are required. We are studying a minimal-risk form of electrical brain stimulation called transcranial direct current stimulation, or tDCS. Previous studies using tDCS have shown that it is helpful in treating conditions like depression and chronic pain. tDCS is administered using two small electrodes that are applied to the scalp. A low current is applied to the electrodes...
  • Principal Investigator:

    Jeffrey M. Miller, MD
    The goal of this study is to examine how effective and well-tolerated a possible new treatment for individuals who injure themselves frequently will be. All research procedures can be done from home no in-person visits are required. We are studying a minimal-risk form of electrical brain stimulation called transcranial direct current stimulation, or tDCS. Previous studies using tDCS have shown that it is helpful in treating conditions like depression and chronic pain. tDCS is administered using two small electrodes that are applied to the scalp. A low current is applied to the electrodes...
  • Principal Investigator:

    Jeffrey M. Miller, MD
    The goal of this study is to examine how effective and well-tolerated a possible new treatment for individuals who injure themselves frequently will be. All research procedures can be done from home no in-person visits are required. We are studying a minimal-risk form of electrical brain stimulation called transcranial direct current stimulation, or tDCS. Previous studies using tDCS have shown that it is helpful in treating conditions like depression and chronic pain. tDCS is administered using two small electrodes that are applied to the scalp. A low current is applied to the electrodes...
  • Principal Investigator:

    Barbara H. Stanley, PhD
    Our research team studies the biological causes of depression and suicidal behavior using behavioral research. Our ultimate goal is to improve prevention of suicide. You may be eligible if you have depression either with or without suicidal thoughts or previous suicide attempts. Participation involves clinical assessments, a week-long phone survey, a stress test and computer games, with compensation of $250. If you also sign up for our companion neuroimaging study, you could receive up to a total of $1,250 and 6 months of free psychiatrist visits for medication treatment. Our rigorous safety...
  • Principal Investigator:

    Barbara H. Stanley, PhD
    Our research team studies the biological causes of depression and suicidal behavior. Our ultimate goal is to improve prevention of suicide. You may be eligible to participate as a healthy control if you do not have psychiatric illness. Participation involves clinical assessments, a week-long phone survey, a stress test and computer games, with compensation of $250. If you also sign up for our neuroimaging study, you could receive up to a total of $1,250. Our rigorous safety protocols minimize the risk of COVID-19 exposure.