Anthony Puliafico, PhD

Expertise in: 
Psychology, Child Psychiatry / Psychology, Anxiety Disorders
Accepting New Patients
Treats Children
Profile Headshot

Overview

Areas of Expertise / Conditions Treated

Psychology, Child Psychiatry / Psychology, Anxiety Disorders, Child Psychotherapy, Cognitive/Behavioral Therapy, Anxiety, Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder, School & Learning Problems, Social Phobia, Generalized Anxiety Disorder, Separation Anxiety, Phobias, Tic Disorder, Trichotillomania, Psychotherapy

Academic Appointments

  • Assistant Professor of Medical Psychology (in Psychiatry) at CUMC

Administrative Titles

  • Director, Columbia University Clinic for Anxiety and Related Disorders (CUCARD)-Westchester

Anthony Puliafico, Ph.D. is an assistant professor of clinical psychology in the Division of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at Columbia University. He serves as Director of the Columbia University Clinic for Anxiety and Related Disorders (CUCARD) -Westchester, an outpatient clinic in Columbia University's Child and Adolescent Division that specializes in the treatment of anxiety disorders, obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and related disorders in children, adolescents and adults. Dr. Puliafico specializes in the assessment and cognitive-behavioral treatment of anxiety, mood and externalizing disorders. His clinical work and research have focused on the treatment of pediatric OCD, school refusal, and adapting treatments for young children with anxiety.

Dr. Puliafico received his Ph.D. in clinical psychology from Temple University. He completed his clinical psychology internship at Bellevue Hospital Center/NYU Medical Center and his post-doctoral fellowship at the Columbia University Clinic for Anxiety and Related Disorders (CUCARD). Dr. Puliafico has published his work in numerous peer-reviewed journals and regularly lectures on the treatment of pediatric anxiety disorders. He is the co-author of "The OCD Workbook for Kids".

Hospital Affiliations

  • NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia
  • NewYork-Presbyterian/Morgan Stanley Children's Hospital

Gender

  • Male

Schedule an Appointment

Phone Appointments

New Patients:
212-305-6001
Existing Patients:
646-317-3585

Location(s)

ColumbiaDoctors Tarrytown
155 White Plains Road
Tarrytown, NY 10591
New Patient Appointments:
914-631-4618
Primary

Insurance Accepted

For billing questions, please call (212) 305-2600.

UnitedHealthcare

  • Behavioral Health Columbia University Employee Plan

*Please contact the provider’s office directly to verify that your particular insurance is accepted.

Credentials & Experience

Education & Training

  • PhD, Temple University
  • Internship: Bellevue Hospital Center - New York University
  • Fellowship: NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Columbia University Medical Center

Honors & Awards

Elected President of the Association for Behavioral and Cognitive Therapies (ABCT) Child and Adolescent Anxiety Special Interest Group (2013)

Research

Selected Publications

  • Puliafico, AC, Comer, JS, & Albano, AM. Coaching Approach Behavior and Leading by Modeling: Rationale, Principles, and a Session-by-Session Description of the CALM Program, Cognitive and Behavioral Practice 2013: 517-528.
  • Puliafico, AC, Comer, JS, & Pincus, DB. Adapting Parent-Child Interaction Therapy to treat anxiety disorders in young children. Child and Adolescent Clinics of North America 2012: 607-619.
  • Comer, JS, Puliafico, AC, Aschenbrand, SG, McKnight, K, Robin, JA, Goldfine, ME, & Albano, AM. A pilot feasibility evaluation of the CALM Program for anxiety disorders in early childhood. Journal of Anxiety Disorders 2012: 26, 40-49.
  • Rynn,M, Puliafico,A, Heleniak,C, Rikhi, P, Ghalib,K, & Vidair,H. Advances in pharmacotherapy for pediatric anxiety disorders. Depression and Anxiety 2011; 28: 76-87.
  • Puliafici, AC, Comer, JS, & Kendall, PC: Social phobia in youth: The diagnostic utility of feared social situations. Psychological Assessment 2007; 19: 152-158.
  • Puliafici, AC, & Kendall, PC: Threat-related attentional bias in anxiety-disordered youth: A review. Clinical Child and Family Psychology Review 2006; 9:162-180.