Current Studies

Here is a list of some of our current studies. For additional studies, please visit RecruitMe.

  • The Center for OCD and Related Disorders and the Institute of Genomic Medicine is conducting a study to look for genetic causes of OCD. Our goal is to look at the genes of individuals with OCD to see if we can identify what may have put those individuals at risk for OCD. Participants will receive a clinical evaluation at no cost, a blood draw (up to 2 tablespoons) and compensation for their time. Significant findings from these genetic tests will be reported back to participants (if they chose to be notified of results).
  • In this research study, you will be fitted with hearing aids that may be fully tuned to improve your hearing (full dose) or may be only partially tuned and not likely to substantially improve your hearing (low dose). You will receive a free hearing aid that will be at full dose at the end of the 12 week study. You will also receive treatment for depression with an FDA approved medication called escitalopram (Lexapro) or duloxetine (Cymbalta).
  • We are conducting research to compare different ways of improving sleep and mood in teens. Treatment involves Behavioral Sleep Therapy and Interpersonal Psychotherapy for Adolescents targeting: depression trouble falling and staying asleep not feeling rested on waking feeling sleepy during the day. Study Procedures: ~ A free, thorough diagnostic evaluation ~ A full course of therapy (8-20 sessions) at no cost ~ Saliva collection and sleep monitoring before and after treatment ~ Study evaluations and treatment will be provided at no cost to you.
  • We are recruiting healthy volunteers to participate in our diagnostic brain imaging study. This new study aims to investigate individuals experiencing persistent pain that was triggered by Lyme Disease. By utilizing brain imaging (functional MRI), we hope to gain a better understanding of why patients have ongoing problems with persistent pain, fatigue, and sensory sensitivity even after antibiotic treatment. We suspect that Lyme disease may change the pattern of an individual's brain activation, making him or her more sensitive to pain than a healthy person.

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