Current Studies

Here is a list of some of our current studies. For additional studies, please visit RecruitMe.

  • This study is a double-blind and placebo-controlled study to assess its efficacy of the new drug Lumateperone for patients already taking lithium or Depakote but are still suffering from symptoms of depression as a product of bipolar disorder. Lumateperone is thought to exert its antidepressant effect through interaction with sereotogenic, dopaminergic, and glutamergic neurotransmitter targets.This is a 10 week outpatient study where patients will be given Lumateperone pills to take daily in combination with their current mood stabilizers.
  • This study is a double-blind and placebo-controlled study to assess its efficacy of the new drug Lumateperone for patients with Major Depressive Episodes associated with Bipolar I and Bipolar II disorder. Lumateperone is thought to exert its antidepressant effect through interaction with sereotogenic, dopaminergic, and glutamergic neurotransmitter targets.This is a 6 week outpatient study where patients will be given Lumateperone pills to take daily. A single dose will be taken each evening, starting with the evening of their baseline period.
  • The study is an outpatient treatment study of the safety and benefit of extended-release mixed amphetamine salt (Adderall-XR) in the treatment of individuals with cannabis use disorder and Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The study is a 13-week trial and requires participants to come twice per week. The primary objective of the study is to determine the safety and effectiveness of Adderall-XR in decreasing marijuana use and in promoting a decrease in ADHD symptoms.
  • This study proposes to recruit patients with Opioid Use Disorder (OUD) seeking treatment into our program of a 5 day outpatient detoxification and naltrexone induction followed by a relapse-prevention treatment with Extended release-naltrexone (XR-NTX) for 8 weeks.
  • The CDC estimates that 10-20% of patients with Lyme disease will go on to have chronic symptoms despite having had appropriate treatment, a condition known as Post-Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome (PTLDS). While there is currently no known cure, various therapies are being investigated. One promising approach is the practice of meditation and yoga which have been shown to help pain and fatigue associated with other chronic illnesses as well as to improve overall physical, mental, and emotional health.
  • This study examines normal individual differences in the ways that the body and the brain respond to emotions, and the role of mitochondria in the mind-body connection. Mitochondria are small parts of each cell that make energy to keep us alive. Participants will be asked to come for a single two full-day visit, including two nights at a hotel next to the research center (Columbia University Medical Center). The study visit will include a blood draw, a medical exam, a cognitive testing session, questionnaires, an MRI scan, and at-home collection of saliva and stool samples the following week.
  • Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) are typically treated with two types of medications: stimulants and non-stimulants. These medications work in different ways to treat ADHD symptoms, but we do not fully understand the brain mechanisms underlying the medications' effects. This study will use MRI scanning to look at changes in the brain associated with medication treatment of ADHD in children.
  • The purpose of this research study is to find out which antidepressants work best in individuals over the age of 60 years. We invite you to participate in this research study because you are 60+ years old have depression and your depression has not gotten better even after taking two or more medications.
  • This study will assess the ability of the opioid antagonist, naltrexone, to block the effects of intranasal methamphetamine. This study is seeking healthy male and female users of psychostimulants like cocaine, methamphetamine between the ages of 21-50. For those who pass screening, the study consists of 4 outpatient testing sessions. Participants are compensated $125 per session.
  • Psilocybin is the active ingredient in some forms of psychedelic mushrooms. Its effects can include euphoria, visual hallucinations, changes in perception, a distorted sense of time and spiritual experiences. Adverse events can include headaches, rapid heart beat, increased blood pressure, nausea and panic attacks. All of these effects generally last minutes to hours, though perceptual changes occasionally recur to a lesser and lesser extent as they dissipate over several weeks.

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