Current Studies

Here is a list of some of our current studies. For additional studies, please visit RecruitMe.

  • Principal Investigator

    J. John Mann, MD
    This research study uses brain imaging to explore the biological causes of depression and suicidal behavior. We hope to develop a better understanding of how people who attempt suicide differ from those who do not in order to improve prevention. Participation includes brain imaging scans (MRI and PET), neuropsychological tasks and clinical assessment. Eligible individuals will be compensated up to $475.
  • Principal Investigator

    J. John Mann, MD
    This research study uses brain imaging to explore the biological causes of major depression and why some people feel suicidal or may act on such thoughts. We hope to develop a better understanding of how people who feel depressed and suicidal cope with their feelings so we can improve treatment and prevention. You may qualify if you have depression with or without suicidal thoughts or any history of suicide attempts. Participation involves a detailed diagnostic set of interviews, brain imaging scans (MRI and PET) and neuropsychological tasks.
  • Principal Investigator

    Bret R. Rutherford, MD
    In this research study, you will receive a medication called carbidopa/levodopa (Sinemet). This medication is approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of Parkinson's Disease. We are using carbidopa/levodopa off-label in this study to see whether it is capable of improving depressive symptoms as well as mental and physical slowing that occur as people age.
  • Principal Investigator

    Jeffrey A. Lieberman, MD
    This study plans to learn more about an investigational new drug called lumateperone tosylate (ITI-007) and may help us find new types of treatment for schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorder.
  • Principal Investigator

    Elias Dakwar, MD
    This 12-week free and confidential outpatient study is recruiting healthy adults who are currently seeking treatment for alcohol use. Participants will engage in twice-weekly clinic visits during which they will meet with a physician and complete measures with research assistants. Participants will also receive innovative, investigative medications twice throughout this trial (Weeks 2 and 5) to help facilitate their engagement in treatment.
  • Principal Investigator

    Elias Dakwar, MD
    This 12-week free and confidential outpatient study is recruiting healthy adults who are currently seeking treatment for cocaine use. Participants will engage in twice-weekly clinic visits during which they will have mindfulness-based therapy sessions, meet with a physician, and complete measures with research assistants. Participants will also receive innovative investigational medications twice throughout this trial (Weeks 1 and 5) to help facilitate their engagement in treatment.
  • Principal Investigator

    Elias Dakwar, MD
    This free and confidential study is recruiting healthy adults who are currently seeking treatment for opioid use (heroin, painkillers). Participants will be admitted into our inpatient unit for the first 3 to 5 days of the study. In addition to traditional medications used during detoxification, you will also receive innovative, investigative medications that may help with the transition onto Vivitrol (extended-release nalrexone). After discharge from the inpatient unit, participants will engage in twice-weekly outpatient visits for 12 weeks.
  • Principal Investigator

    Jonathan E. Posner, MD
    Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) are typically treated with two types of medications: stimulants and non-stimulants. These medications work in different ways to treat ADHD symptoms, but we do not fully understand the brain mechanisms underlying the medications' effects. This study will use MRI scanning to look at changes in the brain associated with medication treatment of ADHD in children.
  • Principal Investigator

    Jonathan E. Posner, MD
    Children with Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) are typically treated with two types of medications: stimulants and non-stimulants. These medications work in different ways to treat ADHD symptoms, but we do not fully understand the brain mechanisms underlying the medications' effects. This study will use MRI scanning to look at changes in the brain associated with medication treatment of ADHD in children.
  • Principal Investigator

    Steven P. Roose, MD
    The purpose of this research study is to find out which antidepressants work best in individuals over the age of 60 years. We invite you to participate in this research study because you are 60+ years old have depression and your depression has not gotten better even after taking two or more medications.

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