Current Studies

Here is a list of some of our current studies. For additional studies, please visit RecruitMe.

  • The study is an outpatient treatment study of the safety and benefit of extended-release mixed amphetamine salt (Adderall-XR) in the treatment of individuals with cannabis use disorder and Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). The study is a 13-week trial and requires participants to come twice per week. The primary objective of the study is to determine the safety and effectiveness of Adderall-XR in decreasing marijuana use and in promoting a decrease in ADHD symptoms.
  • This study proposes to recruit patients with Opioid Use Disorder (OUD) seeking treatment into our program of a 5 day outpatient detoxification and naltrexone induction followed by a relapse-prevention treatment with Extended release-naltrexone (XR-NTX) for 8 weeks.
  • The CDC estimates that 10-20% of patients with Lyme disease will go on to have chronic symptoms despite having had appropriate treatment, a condition known as Post-Treatment Lyme Disease Syndrome (PTLDS). While there is currently no known cure, various therapies are being investigated. One promising approach is the practice of meditation and yoga which have been shown to help pain and fatigue associated with other chronic illnesses as well as to improve overall physical, mental, and emotional health.
  • We will evaluate the D-cycloserine (DCS) and lurasidone with MRI measurement of brain responses to DCS. DCS is a drug that works on the same brain receptor as ketamine. DCS is not approved by the FDA for bipolar depression. Study participants will receive a dose of lurasidone or placebo in one MRI and a dose of DCS in another, followed by an optional follow-up four week phase of lurasidone plus DCS. We hope to develop a better understanding of how these medications work.
  • Research Study using MRI to examine learning and memory in persons who have not been diagnosed with any neurological or psychiatric disorders. All ethnic groups can participate. Must have no history of psychological or neurological disorders. WHERE? The study will take place at the New York State Psychiatric Institute, 1051 Riverside Drive in Manhattan. WHAT WILL HAPPEN? Participation in our study involves three parts: interviews, games and puzzles, and an MRI scan. The total compensation for your time is $350.
  • The purpose of this research study is to find out which antidepressants work best in individuals over the age of 60 years. We invite you to participate in this research study because you are 60+ years old have depression and your depression has not gotten better even after taking two or more medications.
  • This study will assess the ability of the opioid antagonist, naltrexone, to block the effects of intranasal methamphetamine. This study is seeking healthy male and female users of psychostimulants like cocaine, methamphetamine between the ages of 21-50. For those who pass screening, the study consists of 4 outpatient testing sessions. Participants are compensated $125 per session.
  • The purpose of this study is to examine the use of a new portable brain imaging device to study a measure of brain activity, and to develop optimal methods for analyzing the data from this device. After baseline assessments including clinical interview, physical exam, and blood tests, participants will undergo 3 brain scans on separate days: two Positron Emission Tomography (PET) scans, each lasting one hour, using different PET cameras, to measure metabolic activity in the brain, and one Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scan, to obtain information about brain structure.
  • The goal of this study is to examine how effective and well-tolerated a possible new treatment for individuals who injure themselves frequently will be. We are studying a minimal-risk form of electrical brain stimulation called transcranial direct current stimulation, or tDCS. Previous studies using tDCS have shown that it is helpful in treating conditions like depression and chronic pain. tDCS is administered using two small electrodes that are applied to the scalp. A low current is applied to the electrodes using a battery-operated device.
  • The goal of this study is to examine how effective and well-tolerated a possible new treatment for individuals who injure themselves frequently will be. We are studying a minimal-risk form of electrical brain stimulation called transcranial direct current stimulation, or tDCS. Previous studies using tDCS have shown that it is helpful in treating conditions like depression and chronic pain. tDCS is administered using two small electrodes that are applied to the scalp. A low current is applied to the electrodes using a battery-operated device.

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