Mara Eilenberg, MSW, LCSW

Profile Headshot

Profile Navigation

Overview

Ms. Eilenberg provides therapy to adolescents, young adults, and families at NYSPI’s Children’s Day Unit, where she is Clinical Director of the day program. She also serves as a clinician for research conducted at Columbia's Youth Treatment and Evaluation of Anxiety and Mood (Y-TEAM) Program. Ms. Eilenberg received a Bachelor’s degree from Trinity College, in Hartford, Connecticut, a Master’s degree in Social Work from New York University, and a Certificate in Psychodynamic Psychotherapy from the American Institute of Psychoanalysis/Karen Horney Center.

She is currently Associate Director of the Social Work Department at New York State Psychiatric Institute (NYSPI) and Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatric Social Work (in Psychiatry) in the Department of Psychiatry at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons. She is also responsible for supervision on the Children’s Day Unit of MSW interns from the NYU Silver School of Social Work, where she is an Adjunct Assistant Professor, and from the Columbia School of Social Work, where she holds the title of Instructor. Ms. Eilenberg served as an Interpersonal Psychotherapist for the Complicated Grief Treatment Studies, a program at NYSPI/Columbia School of Social Work.

Academic Appointments

  • Assistant Clinical Professor of Psychiatric Social Work (in Psychiatry)

Administrative Titles

  • Clinical Director, Children’s Day Unit at Columbia University Youth Treatment and Evaluation of Anxiety and Mood (Y-TEAM) Program
  • Associate Director of the Social Work Department at New York State Psychiatric Institute (NYSPI)

Gender

  • Female

Research

I am continuing to work with Ellen Lukens, PhD, faculty member at NYSPI and the Columbia University School of Social Work, to expand the implementation of the intervention we developed for parents and caregivers of children and adolescents with OCD. The goals of intervention are 1) to educate parents about playing a knowing or unknowing role in the perpetuation of their child’s OCD symptoms through accommodation 2) to help parents learn and understand how their child’s unique symptoms impact functioning and family life, and 3) to give parents an opportunity to speak freely about the experience of having a child with OCD. By identifying and building upon the strengths of the child and family through psychoeducation, the intervention will support the gains made in the child’s individual treatment and contribute to improved family functioning.

Selected Publications

  • Eilenberg, M. & Wyman, S. (1998) Scapegoating in an early adolescent girls' group. Journal of Child and Adolescent Group Therapy, 8 (1):3-11
  • Waslick, B.D., Walsh, B.T., Greenhill, L.L., Eilenberg, M., Capasso, L., Lieber, D. (1999) Open trial of fluoxetine in children and adolescents with dysthymic disorder or double depression. Journal of Affective Disorders, 56 (2-3):227-236
  • Mazzoni, P., Kimhy, D., Khan, S., Posner, K., Maayan, L., Eilenberg, M., Messinger, J., Kestenbaum, C., Corcoran, C. (2009) Childhood onset diagnosis in a case series of teens at clinical high risk of psychosis. Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychopharmacology, 19 (6): 771-776
  • Ben David, S., Birnbaum, M., Eilenberg, M., DeVylder, J., Gill, K., Schienle, J., Azimov, N., Lukens, E., Davidson, L., Corcoran, C. (2014) The subjective experience of youths at clinically high risk of psychosis: A qualitative study. Psychiatric Services, 65 (12): 1499-1501